Home Ortley Beach Ortley Beach a Week After the Nor’Easter: Sand Berms (Mostly) in Place

Ortley Beach a Week After the Nor’Easter: Sand Berms (Mostly) in Place

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Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

Construction crews have been working for a week to reconstitute temporary, protective sand berms that washed away during the Jan. 23 nor’easter.

By Thursday of this week, most of the Ortley Beach portion of the township had been completed, with berms arguably taller than the last ones protecting the beaches from potential future coastal storms. Beach entrances are off limits to the public, and heavy equipment was still working in the northern blocks of the neighborhood above the Third Avenue beach.

Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

According to Toms River officials, Cardinal Construction, the township’s contractor, will deliver between 1,500 and 2,000 truckloads of sand to Ortley Beach and Normandy Beach. Ortley Beach is receiving the first loads of sand, then crews will move to Normandy Beach.

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The deliveries will add up to 30,000 cubic yards total.

Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor'easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)
Work continues to rebuild protective berms in Ortley Beach following a nor’easter, Feb. 2, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Nee)

The funding to pay for the sand replacement will come from $5 million the township council transferred last year from a capital bond ordinance account to a fund set aside for beach repairs, officials said.

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  • thegoodlife

    yea, that’ll work. Might as well try lowering the ocean as building those dunes.

  • Don Smith

    Large volumes of government money spent to shovel sand against the tide. Where was the DEP after Sandy when the government destroyed the natural coast of NJ? The ocean will never allow a beach to exist east of the steel wall and the beaches to the south will be desimated during every storm. The steel wall has to go. Houses built on the barrior island should be built right and limited in size so more people can have access to the water.